Ugly Democracy: the North Carolina Marriage Amendment

Same-sex marriage legislation is complicated in the U.S. Click the image to find out what the colors mean. (Graphic: Lokal_Profil)

60 percent of North Carolinians  voted to enact a constitutional ban on same-sex marriage yesterday. So, let’s just say that I’m pretty disgusted with about 60 percent of North Carolinians. It should be noted that gay marriage has been illegal in the state since 1996 but, apparently, social conservatives and culture warriors saw need to entomb their views in the state constitution.

Of particular interest to me is whether or not as much support could be mustered for a constitutional ban on adultery. Or, better yet, would 60 percent of North Carolinians vote to enact a constitutional ban on divorce? Both are even more insidious threats to “traditional marriage of one man and one woman” than same-sex marriage will ever be. But, we all know that neither of those things will ever, ever happen. Continue reading

A Couple of Interesting Tidbits

A page from the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, first created in the 800s and updated until the mid-1100s. (Photo: public domain)

Note: Unless you find language or history interesting (and/or have an appetite for mostly-useless trivia), this post will probably be incredibly boring to you.

In doing research for my senior paper, I came across a book with a chapter titled A Brief History of the English Language. It wasn’t information relevant to my research, but I found it interesting and read it nonetheless. In the section on Old English, as an example the authors had shown how the Lord’s Prayer was written in Old English:

Fæder ūre þū þe eart on heofonum,
Sī þīn nama ġehālgod.
Tōbecume þīn rīċe,
ġewurþe þīn willa, on eorðan swā swā on heofonum.
Ūre ġedæġhwāmlīcan hlāf syle ūs tō dæġ,
and forgyf ūs ūre gyltas, swā swā wē forgyfað ūrum gyltendum.
And ne ġelǣd þū ūs on costnunge, ac ālȳs ūs of yfele.
Sōþlīċe. Continue reading

What a Trendy Video Says (and Doesn’t Say) About Religion

As of 5 p.m. this afternoon, 22 of my Facebook friends had shared this video on their walls–or, I’m pretty sure it’s timelines now, but whatever. It was uploaded to YouTube two days ago and already has almost 2.5 million views. This is unfortunate, because it demonstrates the degree to which the word “religion” has become a pejorative and used to describe what could be most accurately billed as “legalism.” Furthermore, it highlights the ambiguity associated with “religion” when that word is tossed around by Christians (usually non-denominationals) who claim to be up on Jesus but low on “religion.” As the British would say, that’s bollocks, and I’m about to tell you why. Continue reading